The Aims Digital Blog

Welcome to the Aims Digital blog – covering the latest and the best from the eLearning industry! Read about the latest trends, and our thoughts on how the world of learning is shaping up.
The 10 top mistakes made when creating a Mobile Learning Course

The 10 top mistakes made when creating a Mobile Learning Course

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A typical eLearning program consists of 30 to 45 minute interactive sessions, with additional data provided for later references. Most course materials are delivered through audio, images, video along with a few lines of text. Aided by powerful interactive possibilities, the entire course is kept on track by a Learning management System (LMS).

It would be obvious to any user of an iPad like device that an eLearning session on a tablet or a smart phone would be vastly different. A Mobile learning system is not an eLearning system slapped on a mobile device. It really happens to be in a different class altogether. Anyone who is thinking of creating or migrating to a mLearning system should recognize this crucial fact. This also means that the constraints and opportunities that are a part of the mobile ecosystem must be considered before attempting to design a new mLearning course. Let’s take a look at the common pitfalls or mistakes that can derail this process:

 

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The 10 top things to know when converting from eLearning to mLearning

The 10 top things to know when converting from eLearning to mLearning

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Professor Ray Schroeder, Associate Vice Chancellor for Online Learning at the University of Illinois Springfield, predicts that over the coming years, mobile learning will expand and evolve dramatically. Justin Ferriman, a Learning & Collaboration Consultant, reports in his blog ' LearnDash' that in the year 2013, 47% of organizations in US have started using mobile devices to support formal learning.  This does not mean however, that a person, thinking of converting eLearning methodology to mobile learning, would find the conversion process necessarily smooth and without glitches.

In an eLearning environment, scores of eLearners, remain chained to their desktops or laptops working with LAN or at the most with WiFi network connections. The same learners, in case of a mLearning environment, could be travelling, shopping or even walking along a city street, offline or with limited data transmission capacities. This simply means that the eLearning web site, of so much importance to eLearners, has no relevance now to the m-learner.

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